• We now have a downloadable textbook.  Feel free to store it on your device to suppliment what we learned in class.

    Chapter 1: Matter—Solids, Liquids, and Gases

    Chapter 2: Changes of State

    Chapter 3: Density 

    Chapter 4: The Periodic Table & Bonding

     

     



  • Agenda Week 27 2/18-21

    Posted by Hans Ludwig on 2/18/2020 3:00:00 PM

    Tues 2/18

    * J#103 (a) - Objects float when their density is less than that of the fluid surrounding it.  Objects sink when their density is greater than the density of the fluid surrounding it.  

    * Density of Water - The density of liquid water is 1 g/mL regardless of the volume of water.

    * Float/Sink Lab - (Use the caclulation and water-displacement methods to...) Find volume, mass, and densities of four objects and predict if they will float or sink in water.

    * Density Ball Riddle + D!NG video.

     

    **********************

    Wed 2/19

    * J#104

    * Density Practice #1 WKST - Finish in-class.  Partner correct & return

    * Ch 3 Quizzie Poo 

    *******************

    Thurs 2/20

    * J#105

    * Chapter four textbook availible for download above!

    * Review Chapter 3 Quiz

    * Protons, Neutrons, Electrons LAB
    • Atoms are made of extremely tiny particles called protons, neutrons, and electrons.
    • Protons and neutrons are in the center of the atom, making up the nucleus.
    • Electrons surround the nucleus.
    • Protons have a positive charge.
    • Electrons have a negative charge.
    • The charge on the proton and electron are exactly the same magnitude but opposite.
    • Neutrons have no charge.
    • Since opposite charges attract, protons and electrons attract each other
    • The attractions we see (like trashbags sticking to walls) are due to these sub-atomic interactions (a transfer of electrons)...whoah!

     *****************Free for the price of admission***********

    Pitch Drop Test...The longst continous scientific experiment in history.  This apparant solid (pitch, like the stuff we make roads out of) flows like a liquid.

     

    I mispoke earlier today, claiming glass flowed like a liquid...

     

    For those who thought that pic of a hydrogen atom looked like a black hole... That's not a black hole. This is a black hole...

     

    Comments (-1)
  • Agenda Week 26 2/11-14

    Posted by Hans Ludwig on 2/11/2020 3:00:00 PM

    Tues 2/11

    * J#99

    * Test makeups

    * Sub Report :-)

    * New Seats

    * Ch 3 Reading + WKST [finish as homework]

    [Note that I have posted Chapter 3, availible for download, above.  If you cannot print or download it, tell me; I am hapy to make you a copy]

     *****************

    Wed 2/12

    * J#100

    * Test makeups?

    * Answers to yesterday's homework

    * What is Density? [LAB]
    • Density is a characteristic property of a substance.  No other substance has that density
    • The density of a substance is the relationship between the mass of the substance and how much space it takes up (volume).
    • The mass of atoms, their size, and how they are arranged determine the density of a substance.
    • Density equals the mass of the substance divided by its volume; D = m/v.
    • Objects with the same volume but different mass must have different densities

    ******************

     Thurs 2/13

    * J#101

    * What about the density of weird shaped things?

    * Finding Volume: The Water Displacement Method LAB [HWK: answer Q 6-8]
    • A submerged object displaces a volume of liquid equal to the volume of the object.
    • One milliliter (1 mL) of water has a volume of 1 cubic centimeter (1cm3).
    • Different atoms have different sizes and masses.
    • Atoms on the periodic table are arranged in order according to the number of protons in the nucleus.
    • Even though an atom may be smaller than another atom, it might have more mass.
    • The mass of atoms, their size, and how they are arranged determine the density of a substance.
    • Density equals the mass of the object divided by its volume; D = m/v.
    • Objects with the same mass but different volume have different densities.

    When measuring volume of liquids in a graduated cylinder, we must read from the bottom of the meniscus...except for mercury...which is read from the top...unlike the picture.
    Read from the bottom of the meniscus

     ****************

    Fri 2/14

    * J#102

    * Finish discussion on Displacement LAB
    - Chlorine is 35x more massive than hydrogen.  When you replace some of the hydrogens in polyethelyne, the mass of each molecule increases much more than the increase of distance between the particles.
    - The massive, small atoms in brass (copper & zinc) are very close.  The proximity of the atoms allows for more atoms in a given space than other materials in the lab.
    - The relativly smaller size of sulfur atoms allows there to be more sulfur atoms in a given space than calcium atoms.  THe result of more atoms in a given space is the mass of a piece of sulfur is greater than the same size and shape piece of calcium, dispite there calcium atoms being more massive than sulfur atoms.

    * Pass back tests 

    * Density ppt (see embedded below)

    ********Free for the price of admission*************

     

     

    Somebody got me talking about laminar flow...

     

     

     

     

     

     

    'cause somtimes you jus' need to bob your head...

     

    Comments (-1)
  • Agenda Week 25 2/3-7

    Posted by Hans Ludwig on 2/3/2020 3:00:00 PM

    Mon 2/3

    * J#94

    * Changes of State - Freezing [Lab]
    • Freezing is the process that causes a substance to change from a liquid to a solid.
    • Freezing occurs when the molecules of a liquid slow down enough that their attractions cause them to arrange themselves into fixed positions as a solid.
    • Water (H2O) is a rare exception; when it cools, it's molecules arrange themselves into a array (pattern) larger than their volume in a liquid state.
    • Deposition is when vapor (a gas) goes straight to solid, skipping the liquid state entirely.  Examples are frost and snow

    * [continue] Solid Liquid Gas Transitions Model - include "freezing" and "deposition" on your chart, in your journal.

     The hexagonal, arrangment of frozen water molecules.  Notice they take up slightly more space, frozen than liquid. Water is one of the only substances which does this.

     Liquid water molecules are arranged randlomly and closer than the same molecules when frozen.

     **************************

    Tues 2/4

    * J#95

    * Complete Solid Liquid Gas Transitions Model
    The answers

    * Changing State - Melting [LAB]
    • Melting is a process that causes a substance to change from a solid to a liquid.
    • Melting occurs when the molecules of a solid speed up enough that the motion overcomes the attractions so that the molecules can move past each other as a liquid.
    • Sublimation is when a solid goes straight to gas (vapor), skipping the liquid state entirely.  Examples are dry ice sublimating into carbon dioxide.

    Chapter 2 test on Friday 2/07

     *********************

    Wed 2/05

    * J#96

    * Solid Liquid Gas Transitions ppt

    * Practice Modeling Solid Liquid Gas Transitions
    -> Partner check

    * Ch 2 Study Guide

    ********************

    Thurs 2/6

    * J#97

    * Work with partners to finish Study Guide

    * Answers to study guide (see link above)

    * Kahoot (or read chapter 2...see link above)

    *********************

    Fri 2/7

    * J#98

    * Ch 2 Test

     

    ***************Free for the price of admission********************

    This infrared view of the disk, or plane, of our Milky Way galaxy is assembled from more than 2 million snapshots taken over the past 10 years by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

     

     

    Comments (-1)
  • Agenda Week 24 1/27-31

    Posted by Hans Ludwig on 1/27/2020 3:00:00 PM

    Mon 1/27

    * J#89

    * Heat, Temperature, and Conduction [LAB]
    Conduction - The transfer of thermal energy when faster-moving particles (hotter things) contact slower-moving particles (colder things) and transfer energy to them.   Slower-moving molecules speed up and the faster-moving molecules slow down.
    Temperature - The measure of the average kinetic energy of the particles of a substance.
    Heat -  A transfer of energy from a substance at a higher temperature to a substance at a lower temperature.
    - Thermal Energy always moves from hot to cold
    - Conduction of thermal energy happens through contact

    • Adding energy (heating) atoms and molecules increases their motion, resulting in an increase in temperature.
    • Removing energy (cooling) atoms and molecules decreases their motion, resulting in a decrease in temperature.
    • Energy can be added or removed from a substance through a process called conduction.
    • In conduction, faster-moving molecules contact slower-moving molecules and transfer energy to them.
    • During conduction the slower-moving molecules speed up and the faster-moving molecules slow down.
    • Temperature is a measure of the average kinetic energy of the atoms or molecules of a substance.
    • Heat is the transfer of energy from a substance at a higher temperature to a substance at a lower temperature.
    • Some materials are better conductors of heat than others.

    blue cold sdfg dfhg

    Temp is a measure of the average kinetic motion of the particles in a substance.  While there are multiple colors in each picture, the average colors of the pics are blue, red, and purple (respectively); just like in an object, there are particles of various temperatures (kinetic energy levels) bouncing into eachother, transferring energy, and the average temperature is cold, hot, and medium (respectivley).

    *********************

    Tues 1/28

    * J#90

    * Finish "Heat, Temperature, and Conduction [LAB]"

    * Phet: Energy forms and Changes in Thermal Energy [link avalible on Clever or embeded below]

     *********

    Wed 1/29

    * J#91

    * Changes of State—Evaporation [Lab Due tomorrow...and I mean it!)
    • Condensation is the process in which molecules of a gas slow down, come together, and form a liquid.
    • When gas molecules transfer their energy to something cooler, they slow down and their attractions cause them to bond to become a liquid.
    • Making water vapor colder increases the rate of condensation.
    • Increasing the concentration of water vapor in the air increases the rate of condensation.

    *****************

    Thurs 1/30

    * J#92

    * Turn in Evapration LAB (Ch 2 Lesson 2)

    * Condensation LAB (part 1)
    • Condensation is the process in which molecules of a gas slow down, come together, and form a liquid.
    • When gas molecules transfer their energy to something cooler, they slow down and their attractions cause them to bond to become a liquid.
    • Making water vapor colder increases the rate of condensation.
    • Increasing the concentration of water vapor in the air increases the rate of condensation.

    *******************

    Fri 1/31

    * J#93

    * Condensation Lab (Part 2)

    * Start Solid Liquid Gas transitions Model - Glue into journal.  Model particles in solid, liquid, gas, and their attractions, motion, and distance. include the transitions, evaporation & condensation AND come up with an example for each.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ******************Free for the price of admission*****************

    To show the difference between heat (the transfer of thermal energy) and temperature, consider the following exmples...
    - A good conductor of heat at a low temperature - a flagpole at -20ºC.  Don't lick it. It will freeze the water in your tongue before your body can send more thermal energy to your tongue to thaw it.
    - A poor conductor of heat at a high termperature - space shuttle tile.  Designed to insulate the shuttle upon reentry, the tiles get sreamingly hot, yet do notconduct the heat to things that tourgh them.  See the video below...

     

     

     

     

     

    Comments (-1)
  • Agenda Week 23 1/21-24/20

    Posted by Hans Ludwig on 1/21/2020 3:00:00 PM

    Tues 1/21

    * J#85

    * Ch 1 Reading [our textbook. See the prermalink above]

    * A' to Study Guide for Thursday's Chapter 1 Test

    ********************

    Wed 1/22

    * J#86

    * Finish A's to Study Guide

    * They Might Be Giants - "Solid Liquid Gas" SONG

    * Kahoot review for tomorrow's test

    (* Bill Nye on atoms?)

    *******************************

    Thurs 1/23

    * J#86

    * Ch 1 Test

    ******************************

    Fri 1/23

    * J#88

    * New Seats

    * Finish Nye on Atoms (Or Julius Sumner Miller on Heat Conduction)

     

    Comments (-1)
  • Agenda Week 22 1/13-17/20

    Posted by Hans Ludwig on 1/13/2020 3:00:00 PM

    Mon 1/13/19

    * J#80

    * Week 21 Quizzy-Poo (on Google Classroom)

    * Practice Modeling Particles in a Liquid (due @end of period)
    - Arrangment: is a proxy for position.  You models should show the particles 
    - Attraction: is a proxy for distance/proximity.  Particles in a liquid are close to each other.  The particles in a hot liquid are slightly farther apart than those of a cold liquid.
    - Motion: is a proxy for speed.  We indicate motion with curved lines (one line for slow motion. Three for fast motion)

     Particles of a Liquid at Various Temperatures

    Coming up...
    - Test on Chapter 1 on Wed 1/23

    ***********************

    Tues 1/14/20

    * J #81

    * Pass Back yesterday's Models - In general, EVERYBODY needs to make the particles of a liquid closer together.  Also, not every particle requires motion lines.

    * Identifying Structures ppt game.

    * Structure of Matter ppt & Reading

    [HWK: complete last page of the Reading]

    ************

    Wed1/15

    * J#81

    * Answers to HWK

    * Moving Molecules in a Solid - 
    - In a solid, the atoms are very attracted to one another. The atoms vibrate but stay in fixed positions because of their strong attractions for one another.
    - Heating a solid increases the motion of the atoms.
    - An increase in the motion of the atoms competes with the attraction between atoms and causes them to move a little farther apart.
    - Cooling a solid decreases the motion of the atoms.
    - A decrease in the motion of the atoms allows the attractions between atoms to bring them a little close together.
    - An decrease in the motion of the atoms competes less with the attraction between atoms and causes them to move a little closer together.

    * Ans Journal Q

    Heated molecules in a solid are slightly farther apart, increasing the size of the object

     **************

    Thrus 1/16

    * J#83

    * Air, It's really There! [LAB]
    - In a gas, the molecules have very weak attractions for one another. Molecules are able to move freely past each other with little interaction between them.
    - The molecules of a gas are much more spread out and move independently compared to the molecules of liquids and solids.
    - Whether a substance is a solid, liquid, or gas at a certain temperature depends on the balance between the motion of the atoms or molecules at that temperature and how strong their attractions are for one another.
    - Heating a gas increases the speed of its molecules.
    - Cooling a gas decreases the speed of its molecules.

    Particles of Solid Liquid & Gas

    Here is a comparison of the particles in solids, liquids, and gases.  Note the arrangments, attractions (distance), and motions.  (Error Note: The Solid should have only one motion line, not two or three)

    We have comcluded all the lessons for Chapter 1.  Read the chapter yourself; it's only 5 pages (with pictures).  The test is next week.

    [Just for fun, check out the video below on the physics of weightloss.  Hint: you breath your fat away]

    ******************

    Fri 1/17

    * J#84

    * Quizzy poo for Week 22

    * Study guide for Thursday's Test (1/23) [yes it has been postponed]

    Nota bene: if you are in period 1, fear not; I will not count the quizzy poo you took.  We might take a better formatted version on Monday.]

    ***********Free for the price of admission**************

     

    And while I'm talking about carbon dioxide, trees are amazing!... Where do trees get their matter?

    Don't do this inl my class....

     

     

     

     

    Comments (-1)
  • Agenda Week 21 1/07/20

    Posted by Hans Ludwig on 1/7/2020 3:00:00 PM

    Welcome back and happy new year.  The new year is a fresh start and an opportunity to look back, to reflect on what worked, and make changes for the better.  I am glad you are here with me.

     **********************************************************

    Tues 1/7

    * Change Seats (New schedules?)

    * New Potty Passes - You take care yo your busines on your time so we can take care of our business on our time.  These are your two for this semester.  I no longer accept the old ones.

    *Expectations Review ppt

     

    * Chemestry Intro - What is Matter?
    Matter is anything that has mass and takes up space.

    Crash Course Chemistry 

    **********************

    Wed 1/8/20

    * J#77

    * Molecules Matter LAB
    - Chemistry is the study of Matter
    - Matter is made up of extremely tiny particles calles atoms and molecules
    - Atoms and molecules make up three common types of matter on earth: solids, liquids, and gases
    - The particles of a liquid are attracted to one another, are in motion, and are able to move past one another.
    - Being a solid, liquid, or gas (at a patrticular temperature and pressure) is a propery of a substance.
    [HWK: finish the Qs in the lab sheet]

    Animation of particles in a liquid

    (See videos on popping balloons farther below)

    *********************

    Thurs 1/09/20

    * J#78

    * The textbook is online! [see link above, right below the journal slideshow] Download it onto your device for refrence.  If you need a printed copy, ask me; I'll be happy to print one for you!

    * Molecules in Motion LAB
    - Students designed an experiment to test the relative motion of the particles in hot and cold water.  They idendified the independant variable [the temperature of the water] and the dependant variable [the rate of dye mixing]; all other variables are held constant [amount of water, shape of cup, amount of dye, time of dye drop].
    -Heating a liquid increases the speed of the molecules.
    - An increase in the speed of the molecules competes with the attraction between molecules and causes molecules to move a little farther apart.
    - Cooling a liquid decreases the speed of the molecules.
    - A decrease in the speed of the molecules allows the attractions between molecules to bring them a little closer together.

    *********************

    Fri 1/10/20

    * J#79

    * Ups & Downs of Thermometers
    -The way thermometers work is an example of heating and cooling liquid.
    - When heated, molecules move faster, bounce into eachother harder, and are generally farther apart (i.e. the motion over powers the force of attraction molecules have for eachother).  They increase their volume (not mass).  
    - When cooled, molecules move slower, bounce into eachother less hard, and are generally closer together (i.e. the attractrive force they have for eachother is stronger than their motion). They decrease in volume (not mass).

     

    Coming up...
    * Quizzy-Poo Monday 
    * Chapter 1 Test Wed (1/22)

     

    ***********FreeforthePriceofAdmission***********

    Making plasma with grapes...

     How this happens...

    Popping water balloons in slow motion. They hold their shape after the balloon has popped b/c water molecules attract eachother.

     

    Comments (-1)
  • Agenda 12/16 Week 20

    Posted by Hans Ludwig on 12/16/2019 3:00:00 PM

    Mon 12/16

    * J#73

    * Answers to Study Guide in preperation for Wednesday's final.

    * Practice with important relationships

    SI Units (memorize them)
    Distance -> Meter (m)
    Time -> Seconds (s)
    Mass -> Kiloggrams (kg)
    Velocity -> Meters per second (m/s)
    Acceleration -> Meters per second per second (m/s^2)
    Energy -> Joules (J)
    Force -> Newtons (N)

    HTese won't be available on the test

    ***************

    Tues 12/17

    * J#74

    * Finish Study Guide As (see link above)

    * Kahoot Review Game

     

    HWK Study for tomorrow's final

    *********

    Wed 12/18

    * 1st Semester Final

     

     

     

    Comments (-1)
  • Agenda 12/9-13 Week 18

    Posted by Hans Ludwig on 12/9/2019 3:00:00 PM

    Mon

    * J#68

    * Phases of the Moon Song (See below)

    * Time Lapse Videos of Summer Solstice in the Arctic Circle (See below)

    * Earth, Sun, Moon Systems reading (STEMScopedia)
    - Answer Q's on back

    * Reason for the Seasons WKSHT

    [Please don't say "hemispheres tilt."

    Remember: "a hemisphere faces the sun" (for day/night). "an axis tilts toward the sun." /rant]

    *****

    Tues 12/10

    * J#69 (check out the graphic below)

    * TUVA: Eclipses & Seasons [On STEMScopes through Clever. Due tomorrow]

     

    Sun Moon Earth Systems Test Friday 10/13 (changed!)

    Last day to turn in anything Monday 12/16

    Science Midterm Wednesday 12/18.  I'll get a study guide to you by the end of the week

    **********

    Wed 12/11

    * J#70 (check out the gif of all the lunar phases below...and lunar libration (AKA the "moon's belly dance!")

    * Test moved to Friday!

    * Model Seasons (see pic below)

    * Model Phases of the Moon (see back of Earth Moon Sun Systems Reading from friday of last week)

    * Receive Study Guide

    *********

    Thurs 12/12

    * J#71

    * Nye on The Moon & Seasons

    *********

    Fri 12/13

    * J#72

    * Sun Moon Earth System Test

    * Work on Study Guide

     ******************************

    Free for the Price of Admission....

     Time Lapses from the Arctic & Antarctic...

    Below: This is a satillite view of earth at taken at 6 pm GMT.  Checkout the terminator (day/night line) from this satillite view of 0 degrees N, 0 degrees E (the center of the picture).  We (on December 10) are very close to the winter solstice.  The picture is oriented so the north pole is vertical. 
    The terminator is angled at 23.5 degrees because the earth is tilted with respect to it's orbital plane (ecliptic).  Note: the north pole is completely in the dark; it doesn't see the sun this time of year.  The south pole is completlely in the sun and doesn't see night this time of year. 
    You can actually see it, Cool!

    Terminator of earth

    Below: Here is a diagram of eath's orbit around the solar system.  Note, it is an oblique view, NOT a top-down view.  It shows the position of earth at the four celestial days: summer solstice, winter solstice, vernal equinox, and autumnal equinox AND has important facts bout those days. Note: the direction of revolution, hemispheres, and axial tilt. (Pay no attention to the letters A B C D)

    Diagram of the Seasons

     Below: Hours of daylight in the northern hemisphere as a function of day of the year by latitude.

     

    Below: A gif of the lunar cycle which lasts 29.5 days

    Lunar Liberation

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Comments (-1)
  • Agenda 12/2-6 Week 17

    Posted by Hans Ludwig on 12/2/2019 3:00:00 PM

    Mon 12/2

    * J#63

    * New Investigative Phenomena Table

    * Earth Sun & Moon System: Accessing Prior Knowledge - predict what causes the different phases of the moon

    * Constellations of the Zodiac - Hook. The earth spins (rotates) and orbits (revolves).  Rotation causes day/night and the movement of the sun, moon, and stars across the sky.  Orbit (change of position in the solar system) results in the slow change of the night sky.  The constellations of the zodiac are the constelations blocked by the sun in particular months.  The apparant path of the sun around the celestial sphere is called the ecliptic.
    Stars - A large burning ball of gas in space.  Stars emit their own light.
    Sun - The star at the center of a system.  Our star, named "Sol," is at the center of our solar system.
    Moon - A natural body orbiting a planet
    Solar system - all the things which our sun is the predominant gravity is that of our sun or which orbit our sun.
    [p.s. this has nothing to do with astrology. This is astonomy]

    * IPT - What did you learn about the movement of earth, the apparant movement of the sun, and Zodiac

    * Crash Course Astronomy: Cycles in the Sky [p.s. this is a fantastic rescource! We don't have time in class but the first episode in this playlist is fantastic; it's about what we do in science (in general)]

    ************

    Tues 12/3

    * J#64

    * Eclipse Talk
    - Solar Eclipses
       - Total & Annular Eclipses
    - Lunar Eclipses
      - Total & Annular Eclipses
    - Umbra - the darkest part of a shadow
    - Penumbra - the gray, blurry edge of a shadow
    -Eclipses Packet

    * Crash Course Astronomy: Eclipses

    [Here is a link to an infographic which is too long to post here.  I will post it below (i.e. after "the end of the week")

    ***********

    Wed 12/04

    * J#64

    * Seasonal Tilt and Whirl LAB

    Seasons are caused by the tilt of the earth's axis.  This changes the the length of day and the sun's angle of incidence.
    Days are longer in summer and shorter in winter.  The sun is higher in the sky in summer and lower in the sky in winter.
    The earth's axis is tilted 23.5 degrees. 
    The earth rotates about it's axis.
    The earth moves in two ways at the same time: spin about it's axis (rotation) and orbit around the sun (revolution).
    We break the earth into multiple halves, or hemispheres: eastern and western hemispheres (separated by the prime meridian and the date line) and the northern and southern (separated by the equator).  
    The earth's spin causes day & night. It's orbit causes the seasons and the slow change in the night sky from night to night.
    Today's lab demonstrated the position and orientation of earth as it orbits the sun.  With the northern axis always pointing to Polaris...
    - at position A, it is March and the hemispheres have equal amounts of light.  It is the first day of spring in the northern hemisphere (vernal equinox).
    - at position C, it is June and the northern hemisphere has the most light. It is the first day of summer for the northern hemiphere (summer solstice).
    - at position E, it is September and the hemispheres have equal amounts of light (again).  It is the first day of fall/autumn in the northern hemisphere (autumnal equinox).
    - at position C, it is December and the northern hemisphere has the least light. It is the first day of wither for the northern hemiphere (winter solstice).

    If you need help, see the video below on "Seasons and the Sun"...

    ********

    Thurs 12/05

    * J#66
    -Earth's axial tilt combined with its orbit around the sun cause changes in the length of day and the sun's angle of incidence.

    * Answers to Seasonal Tilt & Whirl

    * Investigative Phenomena Table - reflect on Constellations of the Zodiac, Eclipses, & Seasons

    * Facing Up to the Moon - LAB
    - Copy/Paste lunar orbit model
    - Answer Q' on back

    ***********

    Fri 12/06

    * J#67

    * Finish Facing up to the moon diagram.  Answer Qs. You must first loginto your GUSD google account first, before you can view the document here.

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vT-sudBqHrrtAIYOsmxpRTQrizIUxwquJVIY0TtTpveP3nLEINMrdxZyqr4nTyAjPYK3713hUG2qvEV/pub

    * Earth Moon Sun Systems Reading

    * Phases of the Moon song (see below)

    * EMS Systems Quizzie Poo (google classroom)

     

     ***Free for the price of admission***

     Below: Diagram of the parts of a Lunar Eclipse

     

    Below: Satillite image of the 2016 Malaysian Eclipse.  You can see the actual size of the umbra & penumbra

    Below: The sun's corona (atmosphere) as seen during a total solar eclipse.  The entirety of the sun it blocked by the moon.

    Below: Annular Eclipse as see from earth.  Notice you are actually seeing the sun, itself and all the EME's and solar flares.

    Below: Picture of a lunar eclipse (blood moon)

    Below: Diagram of a Total Solar Eclipse and an Annular Solar Eclipse

    Below: Diagram of a Solar and a Lunar eclipse

     

    The moon's orbital plane is tilted relative to the earth's orbital plane.  This causes eclipses to happen only during foll- or new moons when the moon crosses the earth's orbital plane in places called "nodes."  Here is an animation of the precession of those nodes (which explains why eclipses don't happen every 6 months either)

     Below: Ursa Major ("The big dipper") points to Polaris ("the north star"), a star in Ursa Minor ("the little dipper").  Earth's axis points to Polaris.

    Below: Season & the Sun

     

     

     

     

    Comments (-1)